News from our members

Leominster Credit Union Conducts Book Drive

Leominster Credit Union is collecting new and gently used books during the month of April in association with the Massachusetts Credit Union League’s Annual Book Drive.  The books will be donated to local organizations providing an educational resource for many children.  The books may be dropped off at any Leominster Credit Union Office by April 30, 2016.  For more information contact Kathy Hurley at 978-466-7242 or khurley@leominstercu.com.

Simonds-Hurd April Complementary Care Classes

Fri., 4/1/16                         

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

Sat.,4/2/16         

9:00 -10:00am                    Yoga for Fitness, new 6 week series begins today $60/$12 drop-in, call to register.*

 

Sun.,4/3/16

2:00-4:00pm                       Oneness Blessing Circle, suggested donation $10 to support the Angie’s Spa grant providing free therapeutic services to our cancer patients in treatment

Mon., 4/4/16

4:30-5:15pm                       Strength training for beginners/seniors, new 3 week series begins $30/$12 drop-in, call to register.*

5:30-6:30pm                       Zentangle – Art as Meditation, new 3 week series focusing on Mandalas, $30/ $12 drop-in, please call to register.*

5:30-6:30pm                       Yoga with Linda – Leominster Campus, Guild Conference Room, new 5 week series begins tonight, $50/$12 drop-in  – advance payment required. Call to register now*

Tue.,4/5/16

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

6:00-7:00pm                       Advanced Strength Training, new 4 week series begins tonight $40/$12 drop-in, call to register.*

 

Wed.,4/6/16

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

 

6:00-7:00pm                       Qigong , new 4 week series begins tonight $40/12 drop-in, call to register.*

 

Thu., 4/7/16

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

5:30-6:30pm                       Yoga for Stress Relief –$12 drop-in

 

Fri., 4/8/16                         

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

6:00-7:30pm                       Rest & Restore Yoga – $15, appropriate for all levels, call to register*

 

Sat., 4/9/16        

9:00 -10:00am                    Yoga for Fitness, – $12 drop-in

 

Mon., 4/11/16

4:30-5:15pm                       Strength training for beginners/seniors, $12 drop-in, call to register*

 

5:30-6:30pm                       Zentangle – Art as Meditation, – Mandalas, $12 drop-in, please call to register.*

 

5:30-6:30pm                       Yoga with Linda – Leominster Campus, Guild Conference Room, $12 – advance payment required. Call to register now*

 

Tue.,4/12/16

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

6:00-7:00pm                       Advanced Strength Training, $12 drop-in, call to register.*

 

Wed.,4/13/16

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

6:00-7:00pm                       Qigong – drop-in $12, please call to register*

 

Thu., 4/14/16

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

5:30-6:30pm                       Yoga for Stress Relief –$12 drop-in.

 

Fri.,4/15/16                       

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

Sat., 4/16/16     

9:00 -10:00am                    Yoga for Fitness, – $12 drop-in

 

Tue.,4/19/16

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

6:00-7:00pm                       Advanced Strength Training, $12 drop-in, call to register*

 

Wed.,4/20/16

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

6:00-7:00pm                       Qigong – drop-in $12, please call to register*

 

Thu.,4/21/16

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

5:30-6:30pm                       Yoga for Stress Relief – $12 drop-in, please call to register*

 

Fri.,4/22/16                       

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

Sat.,4/23/16      

9:00 -10:00am                    Yoga for Fitness -$12 drop-in

 

Mon.,4/25/16

4:30-5:15pm                       Strength training for beginners/seniors, $12 drop-in, call to register*

 

5:30-6:30pm                       Zentangle – Art as Meditation, – Mandalas, $12 drop-in, please call to register.*

 

5:30-6:30pm                       Yoga with Linda – Leominster Campus, Guild Conference Room, $12 – advance payment required. Call to register now*

Tue.,4/26/16

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

6:00-7:00pm                       Advanced Strength Training, $12 drop-in, call to register*

 

Wed.,4/27/16

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

6:00-7:00pm                       Qigong – drop-in $12, next four week series starts 5/4, $40, call to register now*

 

Thu.,4/28/16

*Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

5:30-6:30pm                       Yoga for Stress Relief – $12 drop-in

 

Fri., 4/29/16

6:00-7:00pm                       *Acupuncture Clinic – Please call for information/$30

 

Sat.,4/30/16      

9:00 -10:00am                    Yoga for Fitness -$12 drop-in

 

MWCC Speaker Series Continues with Immigration and the Undocumented Student

Whether their relatives relocated to the U.S. generations ago or arrived just recently, participants in Mount Wachusett Community College’s dialogue on immigration realized their family histories share a common theme: Their parents, grandparents, ancestors or even they themselves emigrated for the hope of a better life and greater opportunity.

More than 80 students, faculty, staff and community members turned out to discuss “Immigration and the Undocumented Student.” The March 28 Tea Time Speaker Series event was sponsored by the college’s Diversity Consortium and Gateway to College program, through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, in partnership with the American Association of Colleges & Universities.

The forum was moderated by MWCC Senior Resource Specialist Sharmese Gunn, who developed the Tea Time series as a way to create a dialogue around diverse issues that engages the college community and members of the greater community.

MWCC Trustee Joana Dos Santos, executive director of the United Neighbors of Fitchburg/Cleghorn Neighborhood Center, opened the discussion on a personal note, describing her experience moving from Uruguay to Fitchburg at age 14 when the U.S. had a waiver agreement with Uruguay. While in high school, she realized how expensive college would be as an undocumented student.

Through scholarships, community service programs and support through MWCC, she earned her associate degree. Her immigration status was resolved while she was in college when her green card was granted, and she continued on for a bachelor’s degree at Fitchburg State University.

Realizing the process for others can take decades and entail even greater struggles and obstacles, she has become a strong advocate for immigration reform. Her 40-minute presentation included an overview of the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) programs, now pending before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Following her presentation, participants broke out into small group discussions, sharing a bit of their family history and their thoughts on the national debate on immigration reform. MWCC student Mili Silva, who was involved with planning the event, stood to thank the crowd for attending and asked for their support on this issue.

“I just hope the outcome of this event helps people become well informed on the issue.”

MWCC alumna Joan Mellanson of Gardner was among the community members attending. She shared in her group discussion that although she speaks with an accent, she was born in the U.S. Virgin Islands and is a U.S. citizen. More than four decades after moving to Massachusetts as a young teenager, she said she still encounters judgment.

“I still feel like an alien at times.”

Political Scientist & Author Robert D. Putnam Shares Solutions to Closing U.S. Class Gap During Presentation at MWCC

 

The growing divide between the haves and have nots in America is “the most important domestic problem facing our country today,” renowned political scientist and bestselling author Robert D. Putnam told an attentive audience of students, educators and community leaders gathered at Mount Wachusett Community College on March 25.

 

Over the past four decades, “America has become a more segregated society in terms of education. Our country has become more divided and split among social lines than it used to be. This is a crucial matter for the future of our country and our economy,” Putnam, a Harvard University professor, said during an hour-long presentation filled with staggering statistics, tragic anecdotes and sporadic humor.

 

The event, sponsored by MWCC’s Center for Civic Learning and Community Engagement, was made possible through a grant the college received from the National Endowment for the Humanities in partnership with the Association of American Colleges and Universities.

 

“Bowling Alone,” one of Putnam’s 14 books, was the inspiration behind President Daniel Asquino’s drive to make civic engagement a cornerstone of an MWCC education.

 

Using examples from his latest book, “Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis,” Putnam explained that when he graduated high school, 80 percent of his classmates had achieved a higher level of education than their parents. As he and his peers went on to raise families of their own, they did so with the expectation that their children would do even better.

 

Those, like Putnam, who pursued a college education, did indeed forge a path that enabled their children and grandchildren to have greater opportunities, including access to higher education, extracurricular activities and personal enrichment. Meanwhile, classmates who did not attend college at first fared well in the local workforce, but then the economy tanked, factories closed and stores boarded their windows. Subsequently, their children and grandchildren are now worse off, and the condition is similar throughout the country.

 

“We’ve been here before,” Putnam said, reflecting on the class divide during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The movement over a century ago to make public high school education free and accessible led to the national ethos of the American Dream – the belief that through hard work, everyone has the opportunity to succeed.

 

“That turned out to be the best decision that Americans have ever made because it raised the productivity level of all Americans,” Putnam said. “Everyone was better off, and it leveled the playing field.”

 

Similar to the investment the nation made a century ago in public high school education, a renewed commitment to invest in education is needed to solve the class gap of the 21st century, Putnam said.

 

Solutions, he said, include greater support for early childhood education from birth to age four, and an investment in public education that provides equal access to sports, arts and other enrichment activities, rather than only to those who can afford to “pay to play.”

 

He also advocates for criminal justice system reforms, higher pay for teachers who work in low-income schools, more intensive mentoring for children, and encouraging stable, caring families by boosting wages.

 

Expanding access to higher education is also part of the solution he said, explaining that community colleges are like highway “on ramps” that lead to a better life.

 

“A shared investment in everyone’s kids was key to American growth in the past, and it is key to restoring the American Dream today.”